(37.) Twin Skyscrapers

The puzzle itself is somewhat gimmicky, but I think there’s potentially interesting variations of the idea.

037-twin-skyscrapers

Each grid obeys regular Skyscrapers rules. Additionally, the numbers in the rightmost column of the grid on the left act as clues for the grid on the right, and vice versa.

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(21.) Skyscrapers

Hello!

It’s been a long time since I’ve last posted here, and I assure you I’ve been feeling guilty about it. University has been keeping me busy, and I sort of lost interest in pen-and-paper puzzles for a while, but in the past few months I’ve been trying to get back into it. Most of the puzzles I’ve made since I last posted were gifts for friends and family, and I haven’t yet decided whether I’m going to put them here.

Anyways, given that today is Finnish Independence Day, I made a puzzle to honour it. I thought I’d make a larger-than-usual Skyscrapers puzzle to challenge myself, since so far the largest Skyscrapers I’ve made have been 6×6-sized. Forcing uniqueness turned out to be a real chore.

021 Skyscrapers

Regular Skyscrapers rules.

(4.) Unique Sets

I noticed I forgot to specify a rule yesterday: the rule that numbers may not repeat within a region. I did correct it soon enough after posting the puzzle, though.

A version without a no-repeats rule could well be interesting as well: then, there’s a choice on how to interpret regions with repeated numbers.

  • The choice faithful to the name would be to ignore repeated numbers: for example. a region with {1, 1, blank} would have the same set as a region with just {1}.The example puzzle on the rules page actually solves under these rules as well (as does yesterday’s puzzle, unsurprisingly).
  • The other choice would be to consider them distinct: that is, the regions would be multisets. This would probably be the less interesting variant, but it could work well in sparser puzzles.

Anyways, today’s puzzle operates under the no-repeats rule.

004 Unique Sets 2

Standard Unique Sets rules.